Articles & Chapters

Teleos consultants have published extensively on emotional intelligence, leadership development, leading for results, change management, mindfulness, inspiring others through leadership, and executive coaching.

Articles by other experts are inclucded from time to time at the end of this list. 

Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver of Great Performance

 

by Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, Annie McKee

 

Harvard Business Review
Published in Issue December, 2001
Product Number: R0111C
Ordering Information

Description

You've heard about the importance of emotional intelligence in the workplace — that there's an incontrovertible link between executives' emotional maturity, exemplified by such capabilities as self-awareness and empathy, and their financial performance. Now, new research extends that base. Drawing on two years of research, the authors contend that the leader's mood and his or her attendant behaviors have enormous effects on bottom-line performance. Accordingly, top executives' primal task is emotional leadership. In other words, before leaders can turn to setting strategy, fixing budgets, or hiring staff, they must first attend to the impact of their moods and behaviors. To help them do that, the authors introduce a five-step process of self-reflection and planning. Executives should ask themselves: Who do I want to be? Who am I now? How do I get from here to there? How do I make change stick? And who can help me? Working through this process will help leaders determine how their emotional leadership is driving the moods and actions of their organizations and how to adjust their behavior accordingly.

Subjects Covered

360-degree feedback, Crisis management, Emotional intelligence, Leadership, Nonverbal communication, Performance, Personal strategy & style, Relationship management, Self-awareness, Self-management.

 

 

Reawakening Your Passion for Work

by Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, Annie McKee

Harvard Business Review
Published in Issue April, 2002
Item Number: R0204G
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Description

All of us struggle from time to time with the question of personal meaning: "Am I living the way I want to live?" This type of questioning is healthy; business leaders need to go through it every few years to replenish their energy, creativity, and commitment--and their passion for work. In this article, the authors describe the signals that it's time to reevaluate your choices and illuminate strategies for responding to those signals. Such wake-up calls come in various forms. Some people feel trapped or bored and may realize that they have adjusted to the frustrations of their work to such an extent that they barely recognize themselves. For others, the signal comes when they are faced with an ethical challenge or suddenly discover their true calling. Once you have realized that it's time to take stock of your life, there are strategies to help you consider where you are, where you're headed, and where you want to be. Many people find that calling a time-out — either in the form of an intense, soul-searching exercise or a break from corporate life — is the best way to reconnect with their dreams. People no longer expect their leaders to have all the answers, but they do expect them to try to keep their own passion alive and to support employees through that process.

Subjects Covered

Career changes, Careers & career planning, Leadership, Performance effectiveness, Personal strategy & style, Self evaluation.

 

 

HBR.org: “Dealing with Your Incompetent Boss,” June 2011

View article

Excerpt:

Think twice before ratting anyone out
When you’re working for someone who isn’t getting the job done, it can be tempting to go to your boss’s boss or another leader in the organization. First consider the consequences. “Hierarchy is alive and well. And this person has more power than you do. If you’re going to expose them, you need to understand the political current in your organization,” warns McKee. People at the top of an organization may feel threatened if they see someone trying to take down their peer and may be unwilling to help. Useem agrees. “It’s hazardous to speak up in a very pragmatic sense. If it becomes known that it was you, who’s going to be the first to go?” he says. So if you do decide to formally complain, he advises doing it carefully. Test the waters with someone you trust before going to HR or a superior.

Both McKee and Useem emphasize that there are times when you are obligated to speak up. “In extreme circumstances, if the boss is involved in malfeasance, you have a duty to act,” says Useem. In these cases, you need to go to HR and report what you have observed. Be ready to share evidence.

 

 

Capital Magazine, (Dubai) June 2007
Leading Organizations through Empathy by Annie McKee and Suzanne Rotondo
View Article

 

 

Harvard Business Review,  December 2001

Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver of Great Performance by Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, Annie McKee

Product Number: R0111C Ordering Information

Description

You've heard about the importance of emotional intelligence in the workplace — that there's an incontrovertible link between executives' emotional maturity, exemplified by such capabilities as self-awareness and empathy, and their financial performance. Now, new research extends that base. Drawing on two years of research, the authors contend that the leader's mood and his or her attendant behaviors have enormous effects on bottom-line performance. Accordingly, top executives' primal task is emotional leadership. In other words, before leaders can turn to setting strategy, fixing budgets, or hiring staff, they must first attend to the impact of their moods and behaviors. To help them do that, the authors introduce a five-step process of self-reflection and planning. Executives should ask themselves: Who do I want to be? Who am I now? How do I get from here to there? How do I make change stick? And who can help me? Working through this process will help leaders determine how their emotional leadership is driving the moods and actions of their organizations and how to adjust their behavior accordingly.

 

 

Ivey Business Journal, May/June 2006
Mindfulness, Hope and Compassion: A Leader's Road Map to Renewal by Annie McKee, Frances Johnston and Richard Massimilian
View Article

Executive Decision, March/April 2006
Resonance or Dissonance: A Leader's Choice by Annie McKee and Frances Johnston
View Article

Leader to Leader, Spring 2006
Renewing and Sustaining Leadership by Annie McKee and Richard Boyatzis
View Article

Today's Manager, January 2006
Resonance and Leadership through Hope and Inspiration feature on Dr Annie McKee
View Article

Business Strategy Review, December 2006
Inspiring Others through Resonant Leadership by Annie McKee and Richard Boyatzis
View Article

HR Monthly, September 2005
Resonant Expert (Dr. Annie McKee interviews Wendy Morrison)
View Article

Current, May 11, 2004
Native Radio: at the heart of public radio's mission
Felice Tilin and Bruce Theriault
View Article

CUPA-HR Journal, Spring 2003
Higher Education Leadership Competency Model: Serving Colleges and Universities during an Era of Change by David M. Smith
View Article

Small Group Research, 2003
Group Development: Reality or Illusion?
Wheelan, S., Tilin, F., Davidson, B., 34 (2), 223-245
View Article

Small Group Research, 1999
Relationship of Faculty Group Development and School Productivity
Wheelan, S. & Tilin F., B., 30(1) 59-81
View Article

 

 

Other Articles

Debunking Myths in Brain Research, 2008
Principal's Research Review
Amany Saleh, Vol 3, Issue 2

View Article

 

 

Chapters

The NTL Handbook of Organizational Development and Change Principles, Practices, and Perspectives. The Impact and Opportunity of Emotion in Organizations by Annie McKee and Frances Johnston, Chapter 23. Pfeiffer, 2006.
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Tilin, F. & Broder-Sumerson, J. Team Consultation (Chapter 23). The Handbook of Group Research and Practice edited by Susan Wheelan. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2005.
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